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Arts in Milwaukee

A Public Service Of Milwaukee Artist Resource Network

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Danielle Paswaters

  • Art
  • Dance
  • Film
I am an Art Professional I am a Dance Professional I am a Film Professional

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Contact Info
Danielle L. Paswaters
Milwaukee, WI

(414) 229-5830
paswate2@uwm.edu

artist bio

Born in Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin, Danielle L. Paswaters spent the majority of her formative years just outside of Charleston, South Carolina. Her multifaceted upbringing informs her career in the curation of modern and contemporary art through a focus on issues of social justice and equality.

Danielle is an art museum and gallery professional with over 10 years of academic, curatorial, and administrative experience. She holds a B.A. in Art History with a Business minor and is currently pursuing an M.A. in Art History and Non-profit Management from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Trained as an entrepreneur, a paralegal and an art historian, she is currently the Gallery Manager and Curator at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Union Art Gallery. Danielle has worked on exhibitions including Fifty Works for Fifty States: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection; Gilbert & George; Andy Warhol: The Last Decade; Act/React: Interactive Installation Art and On Site: Santiago Cucullu. In addition, she has curated exhibitions which included works by Reginald Baylor, Mutope Johnson, Michael Davidson, Della Wells, Valaria Tatera, Tia Richardson, Ammar Nsoroma, Jennifer Espenscheid and others. 

Danielle’s current research explores gender inequalities and race relations by way of investigating the community building aspects of interactive art and performance theory. She is specifically interested in exploring the ways in which multiple forms of art can be combined to create a more collaborative and immersive experience. Danielle believes that museums, galleries and community art spaces have the power to be agents of change. By blurring the divide between highbrow and lowbrow art we allow for a wider reach into our communities, which helps to create a greater sense of equality that can then translate into more productive and empowering societies.